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For more information regarding the conference, including registration information and information regarding the conference location please visit: http://abccopyright2016.com
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Wednesday, May 25
 

5:00pm

Registration
Registered delegates should come to the hotel to pick up their registration packages.

Wednesday May 25, 2016 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Lord Nelson Hotel and Suites 1515 South Park St, Halifax, NS B3J 2L2
 
Thursday, May 26
 

8:00am

Registration and Breakfast
Come early to receive your registration package. Breakfast is provided for registered delegates.

Thursday May 26, 2016 8:00am - 9:00am
Lord Nelson Hotel and Suites 1515 South Park St, Halifax, NS B3J 2L2

9:00am

Welcome and Introductions
Opening remarks and welcoming of conference delegates.

Thursday May 26, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
Imperial Ballroom

9:30am

Keynote: Wanda Noel
Keynote address.

Speakers
WN

Wanda Noel

Wanda is a lawyer in private practice, specializing in copyright law. Her clients are predominantly users of copyright material such as libraries, archives and educational institutions. Her clients include the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, Colleges and Institutes Canada, and the Canadian Association of Research Libraries. In recent years Wanda has been legal counsel representing users of copyright-protected works in several high... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Imperial Ballroom

10:30am

Break
Thursday May 26, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

Copyright Best Practices for Learning Management Systems

Abstract:

Based on the findings of an anonymized survey of U15 universities undertaken by the presenters, this session will explore the copyright concerns associated with posting materials in a learning management system (LMS), and how to best mitigate risk for an institution. The session will explore approaches that were identified at various institutions, in the survey, regarding monitoring (for instance auditing—voluntary or required), and copyright messaging (for instance, messages on either blank pages or pop-up windows containing information on copyright) in various LMSs.

The session will build on the analysis that arose out of this survey to present the approach our institution adopted to address copyright in the LMS with an eye to risk mitigation. The session will present the finalized wording for copyright statements in the presenters’ institution’s LMS, and how/where they appear. We will also provide suggestions for monitoring, and how to best educate faculty and instructors on copyright in the LMS. As well, we will discuss some of the technological challenges and considerations in implementing these best practices.

Learning objectives:

This session will provide our audience with an understanding of copyright concerns in the LMS, suggested wordings for warnings/copyright statements (how to draft them, what to include, and so on). As well as considerations about where, how, and when to present these statements in a LMS, as well as some overall technical considerations.

The session will aim to present not only the presenter’s institutional response to copyright in the LMS, but also present a view of the range of approaches and responses across Canada, allowing participants to draw their own conclusions regarding messaging and monitoring in their LMSs.

Speakers
BL

Brian Lesser

Brian Lesser is the Institutional Systems Architect at the Dalhousie University Libraries.
JY

John Yolkowski

John Yolkowski is the Copyright Services Coordinator at the Dalhousie University Libraries


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:15pm
Imperial Ballroom

10:45am

Web-Based Course Delivery and Licenses: Problems and Solutions
Abstract:

Web-based course delivery, be it through institutional MOOCs or consortial solutions, is very much in vogue and likely to stay with us in the future as colleges and university diversify content delivery and revenue streams. While these initiatives are often breathlessly heralded as the future, behind the vision there often lurks sticky details. While these details can often be addressed if identified in advance, they are often overlooked if inconvenient - and what can be more inconvenient than copyright concerns?

This session will look at the experience of Ontario Colleges in delivering course materials for
OntarioLearn, an online course delivery system that pooled the resources of 24 Ontario colleges. OntarioLearn provides a wide variety of enrollment options for students, whereby they may take courses outside of their home institution and enroll in courses at any of the participating colleges. This diversity of options for students creates a potential quagmire for copyright clearances, as many licenses are on an institutional level. This in turn created a complicated situation for those responsible for copyright at these institutions, as they had to identify, flag, educate, and facilitate copyright issues and clearances.

Learning Objectives:

The objectives of this session are to highlight the potential issues and pitfalls that exist with online course delivery, as well as solutions that are available. While there are no failsafe solutions, there are best practices that can be adopted to ensure that liability is limited while at the same time ensuring that content delivery and learning outcomes are not compromised.

Speakers
HB

Heather Buffett

Heather is the Copyright Librarian at George Brown College in downtown Toronto, where she manages the Copyright Office and pens a "highly acclaimed" Copyright column in the College newsletter. Heather works with librarians, faculty, staff, and students across all departments to promote copyright literacy | | within the College community. Prior to her time at George Brown College she practiced law in St. John's.
avatar for Stephen Spong

Stephen Spong

Copyright Services Librarian, Centennial College
Stephen Spong is the Copyright Services Librarian at Centennial College where he is responsible for copyright and accessibility policy development, advocacy and outreach, and licensing. He holds an Masters in Information from the University of Toronto's iSchool and a J.D. from Osgoode Hall Law School. Stephen is a graduate of the Harvard Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians and has demonstrated his dedication to leadership through... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:15pm
Imperial Ballroom

12:15pm

Lunch & AGM (12:15 - 12:35)

 A catered lunch with an ABC Copyright Conference AGM. 


Thursday May 26, 2016 12:15pm - 1:30pm
TBA

1:30pm

Taking chances and getting messy: big thinking and copyright outreach

Abstract

As the 2017 review of the Copyright Modernization Act Approaches, and copyright and scholarly communications issues continue to move more and more into the public eye, libraries are posed with the challenge of educating their communities in these areas and developing capacity to engage with and respond to changes in the law. With an attempt to lift the fog that rests around often complicated issues, libraries create seminars, informational, and academically focused events in an attempt to reach communities and make an impact in these content areas. While there is a place for traditional library events, the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office has found that engaging with target audiences in big and creative ways has lead to higher involvement rates and has brought more media attention to the University and Libraries than in previous efforts. In this past year, we approached this challenge by approaching programming and events in a more involved and innovative way and by taking outreach to a new level that would attract high volume participation while introducing and teaching the UofT community about topics such as open access and copyright.

Using the 2015 Open Access Week Alternate Reality Game (ARG) as an example, we will show how applying tested components such as departmental and community partnerships, communication strategies, risk-taking, and creative programming is the recipe for a high impact event that will catch the attention of students, faculty, and the public. By sharing our successes, and failures, of creating an internationally played ARG, we hope to encourage other institutions to creatively approach copyright outreach to reach and impact a broader audience.

Learning Objectives :

Participants will learn how to create engaging and unique library programming by working to understand their institutional strengths and leveraging those strengths to meeting the needs of their communities. This session will help to fuel creative, risky, and out of the box thinking. By learning from others and trusting ourselves, libraries can produce innovative and impactful programming.



Speakers
avatar for Nelly Cancilla

Nelly Cancilla

Copyright Outreach Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries
Nelly Cancilla is a Copyright Outreach Librarian in the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office at the University of Toronto. She received her bachelor’s degree with honors in English Literature and Studio Art from Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan and a Master of Information with a concentration in Library and Information Science from the University of Toronto. Before working at the University of Toronto Libraries, Nelly worked... Read More →
avatar for Bobby Glushko

Bobby Glushko

Head of Scholarly Communications and Copyright, University of Toronto
Bobby’s research and professional interests cluster around the role of the academic research library as a nexus of the teaching, research, and service missions of the university. He is particularly interested in how librarians can act as leaders in cooperation with a diverse set of partners to identify and dismantle impediments to this role, such as legal uncertainty, fear of new technology, and barriers to accessibility.


Thursday May 26, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Imperial Ballroom

1:30pm

Open Education in Canada: A look at postsecondary implementations of OER

Abstract:

Canada’s important areas of expertise in open educational resources (OERs) are beginning to be built upon or replicated more broadly in all education and training sectors. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in OER initiatives and open higher education in general in Canada, providing insights into what is happening nationally and provincially. There are growing examples of OER initiatives from several Canadian institutions offering free courses to Canadians and international learners. National open education initiatives include the federal government's Open Data pilot project and the Council of Ministers of Education of Canada (CMEC) support for the Open Educational Resource Paris Declaration, as well as Creative Commons Canada. Regionally, the western provinces of British Columbia and Alberta are supporting OER as part of major open education initiatives.

Learning Objectives:

In this paper we have documented efforts, policies and programs that are designed to address innovation; visibility of adoption by others; and the capacity for potential adaptors to make trial applications of the innovation (Rogers, 2013) in the public post-secondary sector. Specifically, we have focused on the action of governments and institutions to provide incentives for the development and trialing of OER in the form of textbooks and scholarly publications and the development of the open education movement that supports MOOCs.

Speakers
RM

Rory McGreal

Prof. Rory McGreal is the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources (OER); and Director of a technical education institute (TEKRI) at Athabasca University. He is also co-Editor of IRRODL (International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning). He is the founder of the OER Knowledge Cloud, a repository of research articles on OER. Previous positions include... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Regency Ballroom

1:30pm

The intersection of OER advocacy and academic copyright management
The increasing use of open educational resources (OERs) in academia presents an ideal opportunity for institutional copyright officers to leverage their unique practical and theoretical expertise and actively participate in these processes of pedagogical innovation. OERs offer a number of advantages and benefits in education practices because the content can be openly reused, retained, revised, remixed, and redistributed to suit any required or preferred purpose. But OERs are not widely understood as of the present, so intentionally relaying OER information, particularly licensing clarifications, in faculty consultations, education and training sessions, and copyright information guides is one direct approach that can close this institutional knowledge gap. Additionally, copyright officers are generally well placed
to facilitate discussion with all relevant stakeholders through their connections with many other
administrative units in the institution; they can also join or help form committees tasked with OER implementation. All such efforts can contribute to a balanced, informed, and productive introduction of OER use in an institution. Finally, conceptual elements drawn from the multi-disciplinary open access discourse can inform the theoretical foundations of an effective approach to integrating OER advocacy with copyright management. These elements can also be used to formulate the concept of “sustainable copyright”.

Learning objectives:

The information delivered in this session will help prepare attendees to:

  1. Develop, analyse, and/or refine existing strategies and copyright management practices for direct involvement in the adoption and creation of OERs in their own institutions based on descriptions of the activities and practices undertaken by the presenter at his institution.
  2. Explore other external support networks for OER implementation strategies and practices based on a description of the initiatives and activities of the BCOER Librarians group.
  3. Explore theoretical foundations and justifications for OER advocacy based on concepts drawn from the open access discourse, as well as elements from specific disciplines such as education, intellectual property, and economics.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Warkentin

Martin Warkentin

Copyright Librarian, University of the Fraser Valley
Martin Warkentin is the Copyright Librarian at the University of the Fraser Valley (British Columbia). As an academic librarian, he has worked in various other capacities over the last seven years, including stints in public services, electronic resources management, and as faculty liaison to the History, English, and Criminology departments. He is currently preparing for involvement in an historical newspaper digitisation project. In addition to... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Regency Ballroom

3:00pm

Break
Thursday May 26, 2016 3:00pm - 3:15pm
TBA

3:15pm

Artists Legal Information Society presentation

This session will discuss the effects that fair dealing has on the practices of creative professionals, with some exploration of the question: How do individual artists and writers interpret fair dealing for their own work? This session will also provide an overview and discussion of the historical development of the fair dealing exceptions in Canadian law. Landmark Canadian jurisprudence will be reviewed and distilled so that the essential facets of the fair dealing exceptions, and how they have historically been applied by judicial authorities in Canada, become clear to participants.  The purpose of this session will be to provide participants with a broad strokes understanding of the law of fair dealing and how it is applied in Canada. 


Speakers
MG

Martin Glogier

Martin Glogier is a solicitor with the Nova Scotia Department of Justice, and President of ALIS. Martin is a lawyer by trade, and an entrepreneur in spirit. Martin holds a law degree and a M.B.A. from Dalhousie University. In his current position, Martin advises the Provincial Government on a variety of commercial and IP-related matters. Prior to this, Martin worked in both small and large private firms, and held certification as a registered... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Regency Ballroom

3:15pm

Hack the Act!

Abstract

 Imagine that our group of stakeholders was given the opportunity to re-work the sections of the Copyright Act most relevant to academic institutions. What would we change? What would we add? In this session, we will split up the participants into groups based on which section of the Act they wish to revisit. Participants can work on paper or in shared online documents that will have been set up in advance. Groups may opt to either annotate, edit, or completely re-write their sections.

Learning objectives

This is an opportunity for us as a group to better understand and articulate our collective wishes regarding an “ideal” copyright landscape for academic institutions. This session will give us a more concrete picture of what is lacking in the current Act, allow for some “bluesky” thinking around what could be changed/added to it, and provide us with a tangible (albeit probably imperfect) result. This exercise should be helpful for all participants in pinpointing our priorities and best hopes in terms of advocacy and education not only leading up to the 2017 Copyright Act revisions, but also looking ahead to further revisions.


Speakers
avatar for Lise Brin

Lise Brin

Project Officer, Canadian Association of Research Libraries
Lise Brin is currently a Project Officer with the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL), on loan for one year from her usual post as Scholarly Communications Librarian at St. Francis Xavier University. As part of the CARL team, Lise is working on advocacy and strategy efforts primarily related to scholarly publishing, open access, and copyright.
avatar for Bobby Glushko

Bobby Glushko

Head of Scholarly Communications and Copyright, University of Toronto
Bobby’s research and professional interests cluster around the role of the academic research library as a nexus of the teaching, research, and service missions of the university. He is particularly interested in how librarians can act as leaders in cooperation with a diverse set of partners to identify and dismantle impediments to this role, such as legal uncertainty, fear of new technology, and barriers to accessibility.
MJ

Michal Jaworski

Michal Jaworski was called to the bar in British Columbia in 2006 and practiced law in private practice for 6 years before joining the in-house legal team at the University of British Columbia. Michal's practice is varied, but focuses on property—from the intangible (intellectual property, primarily copyright), to the personal (primarily procurement), to the "real" (real estate). Michal provides legal advice about copyright to the UBC Library's... Read More →
avatar for Mark Swartz

Mark Swartz

Mark Swartz is the Copyright Specialist at Queen’'s University, where he manages the Queen’'s Electronic reserve service and Copyright Office. In this position, he works with librarians, staff, faculty and instructors across all faculties and schools to develop web-based information and educational programs on copyright. Mark has held two other positions at Queen’'s – as an education librarian and as the online course... Read More →


Thursday May 26, 2016 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Imperial Ballroom

4:15pm

Hack the Act! Presentations
Session will present the results of their efforts to re-work sections of the Copyright Act and engage in discussion in a plenary environment.

Thursday May 26, 2016 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Imperial Ballroom

6:00pm

Opening Reception: Pier 21

Join friends and colleagues new and old for an opening reception at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 on the scenic Halifax Waterfront. Hors d'oeuvres will be served.  Registered delegates will receive a free drink ticket. 2 heritage interpreters will be on hand to provide roving interpretation of the exhibition. 

 Itinerary:

5:30 p.m. Bar open, light dips available at stations.

This will be the optimal time for enjoying the museum and exhibits before the networking and mingling begin in earnest.

6:00 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres service begins.

6:40-7:00 p.m. Prizes awarded

7:00 – 9:30 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres, networking and mingling continue.

9:30 p.m. Bar closes






Thursday May 26, 2016 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Pier 21 1055 Marginal Road Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada
 
Friday, May 27
 

8:30am

Developing a Copyright Application for Small Institutions
Session abstract: 
With the passing of the Canadian Copyright Modernization Act and Supreme Court of Canada decisions of July 2012, a need existed at one community college to expand its recording capabilities for copyrighted materials. Using a case study approach, this session will focus on the process the college used to create an online database application to track copyright records for the institution. More importantly, and integrating approaches used at other postsecondary institutions, the college enhanced the application so that it would enable faculty and staff to do fair dealing evaluations of learning materials. Thus, the online application was developed to
a) raise the level of copyright compliance and
b) enable faculty and staff to quickly check and see if the resources they wish to use are covered under Fair Dealing Guidelines.
The session will feature a demonstration of the college’s online application.

Learning objectives:
  1. Describe the purpose and rationale behind the college’s decision for a) revising its copyright database and b) creating a user-focused fair dealing application.
  2. Assess whether the college’s solution for a fair dealing application is applicable to your own institutional context.

Speakers
SS

Sheila Swan

Sheila Swan is the Copyright Officer at Bow Valley College in Calgary.She has worked in the Copyright field for the past 17 years.


Friday May 27, 2016 8:30am - 10:30am
Imperial Ballroom

8:30am

Don't stop believin'...the LOCR journey

Abstract: 
What happens when one institution develops a complex IT application specifically built for their campus community, and a second, very different institution implements the same system? This session outlines the successes and failures experienced by the U of T Libraries staff in implementing UBC’s LOCR e-reserves application, an open-source alternative to existing library reserve services software currently on the market.

This is a story of a complex project implementation: U of T’s experience with LOCR is a case study in the management of a major open-source IT project. Alongside general insights on complex IT project management in academic libraries, the session will discuss strategies for managing the ups and downs of applications and copyright training for staff, decentralized workflows, backend programming issues, as well as the challenges of marketing this whole new world of e-reserves to instructors and students. The invaluable perspectives of LOCR creators at UBC and other institutions using different e-reserves systems will also be included in this session.

This session will be of interest not only to attendees considering the adoption of an electronic reserves application, but also to anyone who is thinking about executing a major project.

Learning Objectives: 

 

  • Development of the project management skills needed to execute complex projects at home institutions
  • Understanding of alternative e-reserve applications available and implementation process. Discussion of copyright training necessary for staff will also be included.
  • Appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages of adopting an open-source solution
  • The importance of marketing and outreach in introducing new systems to internal stakeholders and collaborators

 



Speakers
SO

Stephanie Orfano

Stephanie is a Copyright Outreach Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries’ Scholarly Communication and Copyright Office (SCCO). Stephanie and Graeme collaborate with faculty, staff and students on issues related to copyright, licensing and permissions, and the many paths to open scholarship.
avatar for Graeme Slaght

Graeme Slaght

Copyright Outreach Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries


Friday May 27, 2016 8:30am - 10:30am
Imperial Ballroom

8:30am

Notice and Notice: Cut and Paste to Automate
Session abstract: 
At Ryerson University in the last year we went from our Notice and Notice response being a thankless job of cut and paste being sent out by hand by the Copyright Librarian, to an partially automated database system programmed and supported by our Computing Services department with the Copyright Librarian in a reviewing role. There were issues along the way - lost data and blackouts of data so no user information could be retrieved, problems with environments on campus that did not retain user information or would not release information, daylight saving time making for misread time stamps, responding to student and faculty reaction to the notices, reviewing the copyright notice email account to
see if creators were following up on requests, follow ups regarding data retention schedules, tracking trends in volume of notices and looking for trends in who was sending notices out, as well as liaising with legal staff as needed.

Learning objectives:
  • Processes needed to properly implement an automated notice and notice regime in a higher education
  • institution.
  • Trouble shooting potential technical issues and follow-up procedures.
  • Tips on dealing with a higher education community response to receiving notices.
  • Tips on dealing with copyright creators follow-up.

Speakers
AL

Ann Ludbrook

Ann Ludbrook is the Copyright and Scholarly Engagement Librarian at Ryerson University. In her job she manages copyright clearances in the E-Reserve system run by the Ryerson University Library and Archives, educates the Ryerson community about copyright issues and is responsible for following up on copyright matters at Ryerson University.


Friday May 27, 2016 8:30am - 10:30am
Imperial Ballroom

10:30am

Break
Friday May 27, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

Exception v. License: Meera Nair
With reference materials increasingly distributed via subscriptions for access to digital content, educational institutions risk losing the range of uses previously available when the material existed only in paper form. Although digital form enhances opportunities for use, some publishers limit unauthorized uses through license agreements. This is troubling as the Copyright Act expressly sanctions some unauthorized uses through statutory exceptions to copyright. 

Among these exceptions, fair dealing is the most prominent and most relied upon in educational settings. This presentation is based upon a draft paper which serves to frame the issue of restricted copying against fair dealing. Taking into consideration the history of prohibitive notices, the role of public policy, the history and practice of legislative amendment, and the various presumptions represented by the role of contract law, this author contends that fair dealing should prevail over specific clauses within license agreements that seemingly remove fair dealing from consideration.

Speakers
MN

Meera Nair

Copyright Officer, NAIT
Meera Nair holds a Ph.D. in communication, with a research focus upon systems of copyright. Her interest in intellectual property began via a BSc. in mathematics, which led to a decade in the area of technology transfer between academia and industry. Currently appointed as the Copyright Officer for NAIT (the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology), she has extensive understanding of the role of exceptions within Canadian copyright law. Author... Read More →


Friday May 27, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
Imperial Ballroom

11:15am

Exception v. License: Facilitated discussion
In this session, a facilitated discussion will take place with conference delegates based on Meera Nair's presentation. 

Friday May 27, 2016 11:15am - 12:00pm
Imperial Ballroom

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday May 27, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
TBA

1:00pm

Assessing Copyright Risk Tolerance for Large-Scale Digitization Projects
Digitizing and sharing materials online makes our cultural heritage more accessible, supporting the dissemination of knowledge and the public good. Navigating related copyright issues, however, can weigh heavily on the feasibility of large-scale digitization projects. Fair dealing and LAM and educational institution exceptions in the Copyright Act may or may not apply to making entire works publicly available online.
Can a risk management approach make it possible for an institution to digitize and disseminate some material for which permission cannot be secured? What departments at the institution need to be involved in the development, approval, and implementation of this approach? What would such a process look like? What factors should it take into account?
Archivists and librarians at Simon Fraser University and the University of Alberta have begun to address these questions through the development of a risk management approach to copyright assessment. This session will describe and compare the resulting protocols and processes at these two institutions. The impetus for their approach and its implementation will be discussed. Speakers will provide examples and share related procedures and forms used to conduct risk assessments. Strategies for responding to potential complaints and take-down requests will also be addressed.

Speakers
DT

Don Taylor

Simon Fraser University
Donald Taylor is the Copyright Officer at Simon Fraser University. Related responsibilities include overseeing the administration of certain digitization projects in his role as the institutional repository coordinator.
avatar for Amanda Wakaruk

Amanda Wakaruk

Copyright Librarian, University of Alberta
Amanda Wakaruk was appointed Copyright Librarian at the University of Alberta (UofA) in August 2015. She completed her Master’s in Library and Information Studies at the UofA in 1999 and worked in public, special, and academic libraries in Edmonton, Virginia, and Toronto before returning to Alberta after the completion of her master’s in Environmental Studies in 2009. Amanda’s career as a Government Information Librarian included... Read More →
JZ

Jennifer Zerkee

Copyright Specialist, Simon Fraser University
Jennifer Zerkee has been a Copyright Specialist at SFU since 2013, and has been addressing copyright issues in her independent work in archives since 2011. At SFU Jennifer provides copyright education and outreach to students, instructors, and staff, and supports the development of copyright procedures and best practices throughout the University.


Friday May 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Imperial Ballroom

1:00pm

From “risky business” to risk management: Dalhousie Libraries’copyright tools for online collections
Archives, libraries, and other cultural heritage institutions embarking on digitization projects must navigate a wide array of issues, one of which is copyright as it relate to disseminating material on the Internet. It is extremely challenging to assess the copyright status of each individual item and Canada’s “orphan work” regime does not extend to unpublished material. In the past, cultural heritage institutions adopted “risk averse” copyright policy frameworks but recent changes in the copyright landscape have encouraged new “risk management” approaches. Modelled on the Copyright Policy Framework recently
developed by the Simon Fraser University Archives, Dalhousie University Libraries has developed a new suite of tools for managing copyright in online collections. This framework allows the Libraries to create online collections of digitized library and archival material while considering a wide array of concerns that relate to copyright as well as privacy.
This presentation will describe how the Dalhousie University Libraries developed a risk management approach to dealing with copyright issues that arise when creating online library and archival collections. The presentation will feature a discussion of the various tools created by the Libraries, such as the copyright assessment tool, protocol for takedown requests, and copyright consent form. The presenters will also discuss the challenges and opportunities that have arisen, as well as future directions in copyright management for the Libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Creighton Barrett

Creighton Barrett

Digital Archivist, Dalhousie University
Creighton Barrett is Digital Archivist at the Dalhousie University Archives and Lecturer at the Dalhousie University School of Information Management. He has presented and published articles on archival collaboration, intangible cultural heritage, and personal archives. His article on personal archives found in Nova Scotia business collections won the 2014 Hugh Taylor Prize from the Association of Canadian Archivists (ACA).
RG

Roger Gillis

Copyright & Digital Humanities Librarian, Dalhousie University / Public Knowledge Project
Copyright and Digital Humanities Librarian, Dalhousie University


Friday May 27, 2016 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Imperial Ballroom

2:30pm

Copyright Practices and Approaches at Canadian Universities
This session [jointly presented by R. Graham and C. Winters] describes findings of a 2015 national survey of copyright practices and approaches at Canadian universities. It takes a look at what appears to have changed in the areas of copyright education, permissions management and policy development since 2008 when a similar survey was conducted by a different research team.

Speakers
RG

Rumi Graham

University of Lethbridge
Rumi Graham is the University Copyright Advisor & Graduate Studies Librarian.
CW

Christina Winter

Christina Winter is the Copyright Officer at the University of Regina.


Friday May 27, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Imperial Ballroom

2:30pm

The University Copyright Specialist: A Cross-Canada Selfie
This session reports on the results of a survey of Canadian university copyright specialists. Who are we? What do we call ourselves? What kind of background and training do we have? Where do we fit into the decision-making processes at our institutions? The researcher interviewed copyright specialists at universities across the country to develop a picture of the emerging role of the university copyright officer.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Patterson

Erin Patterson

Academic Librarian, Acadia University
Erin Patterson has been studying intellectual property issues and Canadian copyright reform since 1997, and has been the copyright coordinator at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia since 2002. She has presented on copyright at Acadia and Novanet, EDUCAUSE, and the Atlantic Provinces Library Association conference.


ABC 2016 pptx

Friday May 27, 2016 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Imperial Ballroom

3:30pm

Closing remarks and wrap-up
Friday May 27, 2016 3:30pm - 3:45pm
Imperial Ballroom